Special needs holland essay - Brookside Dental Care

Education Essay: Holland Essay Special Needs delivers …

The Pakistanis and Bangladeshis are the most conspicuous and perhaps worrisome facet of the post-1997 mass immigration wave. But it’s fair to say that, overall, that wave has brought to Britain culturally problematic populations. About 20 percent of immigrants since 1997 have come from EU countries, overwhelmingly from Eastern and Southeastern Europe. For the most part, these EU immigrants—especially those from Poland—have come not to settle permanently but rather to take advantage of Britain’s vastly higher wage levels and vastly lower unemployment levels compared to those of their native countries. They usually build a nest egg and then leave. (This pattern is almost certain to change, however, as a new set of immigrants from the more recently incorporated EU states such as Croatia choose permanent settlement in Britain over the economically wholly unenticing countries of their birth.) The preponderance of immigrants since 1997—three quarters of net immigration—has been from underdeveloped Africa and South Asia. Somalis are the largest group within this category. Only about 10 percent of them are in full-time work. Single-parent families make up about 60 percent of their households. The founding editor of the liberal magazine , David Goodhart, notes that

I love the Welcome to Holland poem. One of my daughters therapist told me about it and when I read it, I was overcome with emotion. I cant even recite it without tearing up. It hit so incredibly close to home and made me see our life in a whole new light. Having a special needs child is extremely hard on the heart. Some days I don't know which way is up and which way is down. I guess Im still getting used to being in "Holland." Ive only been here for almost 3 years and the hardest thing I still have trouble with is all of the people who's children are younger than mine that are walking, talking, potty-trainning. And like the poem says, it'll always be a spot in your heart for that. But you have to enjoy the life you have and spend little time worrying about Italy :) Thanks for posting this. I always LOVE to read it!

I love the Welcome to Holland poem. One of my daughters therapist told me about it and when I read it, I was overcome with emotion. I cant even recite it without tearing up. It hit so incredibly close to home and made me see our life in a whole new light. Having a special needs child is extremely hard on the heart. Some days I don't know which way is up and which way is down. I guess Im still getting used to being in "Holland." Ive only been here for almost 3 years and the hardest thing I still have trouble with is all of the people who's children are younger than mine that are walking, talking, potty-trainning. And like the poem says, it'll always be a spot in your heart for that. But you have to enjoy the life you have and spend little time worrying about Italy :) Thanks for posting this. I always LOVE to read it!

As parents of special needs children, we are often handed this poem, Welcome to Holland, ..

What people do not realize is the woman how wrote Holland was a writer on sesame street and not a new mom to a child with special needs. She was around 49 years old and her son was in his teens. The poem is not for everyone, and I think her background in media gave the public without special needs kids an easier way to look at “those people”. In my opinion, she new what sold and that is what she wrote. She also profited a lot off of her son’s condition monetarily and professionally by putting him in show business. I am glad to hear other people with special needs children are less than impressed with her poem. I am not sure how authentic her experience actually is.
Someone who truly embraced their experience would not just be passing through another country, they would have moved their permanently as I have.

Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) Collection

that I read said it first. She just came out there bold and brassy and said it… “I despise the poem.” GASP. You know the one… raising a special needs child is like getting on a plane expecting to go to Italy but you arrive in Holland, but Holland ain’t all that bad, it’s just different.

Essay Contests - 2000 to Present | U.S. Naval Institute

I don't remember exactly when I first read Welcome To Holland, Emily Perl Kingsley's essay about the journey of raising a kid with special needs.

If you have a child diagnosed with some form of special needs then you have probably come across the essay by Emily Perl Kingsley. Basically it compares the shock of finding out your child has a disability to the feelings you would have if you planned a trip to Italy, but landed in Holland. The idea behind the whole analogy is that Holland isn’t BAD it’s just different and may take time to readjust your original plans and learn your way around.

Education Department | Hope College

Slowly, through the years and with my son’s openness about his special needs, I’ve become acculturated. Holland is not a horrible scary place, just different. As Kingsley says in her essay, “…you must go out and buy new guide books. And you must learn a new language.” I have. I have embraced being the parent of kids with special needs, thankful that Holland exists and that I am able to appreciate the very special, wonderful things that it offers.


If you have a child diagnosed with some form of special needs then you have probably come across the “Welcome To Holland” essay by Emily Perl Kingsley. Basically it compares the shock of finding out your child has a disability to the feelings you would have if you planned a trip to Italy, but landed in […]

There is an essay, well-known to parents of special-needs kids, that suggests having a disabled child is sort of like planning a vacation to Italy, only your plane lands in Holland instead. We are told that while Italy would have been very nice, if we spend our lives mourning the fact we never got to Italy, we will never appreciate everything Holland has to offer.

"Welcome to Holland" a beautiful essay that helped me understand the blessing of raising a child with special needs. It wasn't the trip I'd planned. . . but the flowers are gorgeous!

It really does get easier. I have an appreciation for Holland. I’ve met lots of new friends here and learned so much. I’ve got the Holland guide books and maps now. I might as well have a tshirt and bumper sticker declaring my loyalty to Holland! There are moments though. There are moments you remember this wasn’t your original destination. I am being candid because I know I am not the only special needs mom going through this.